Category Archives: Art and artists

The Modern Degas You Haven’t Seen

a Degas monotype that looks like an old photograph

 

Beautiful never before seen Degas – his monotypes look like old photographs.. He created these while photography was a fledgling medium so it all ties together.. but look so modern for a 1870s work. Also a great room with landscapes.

The Modern Degas You Haven’t Seen

 

a landscape from Degas:

Degas Landscape

 

The Modern Degas You Haven’t Seen article in the NYT goes into depth about the show. Show is until July 24 at the MOMA. Here is the show website.

 

Thanks to Scotto Mycklebust for the tip, it was worth the trip. If you are an artist and wonder what to take on next, if the old ways are no longer working – experiment, just like Degas.

 

 

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Ancient Rome in HD

Ancient Rome is such a powerful symbol, visually and aesthetically, as well as in terms of ideas, its battles and wars, the powerful personalities that blasted their thoughts across the centuries. Remember I spent hours with ancient Roman marble busts from the Vatican, just like with old friends.

Here is Caesar’s marble bust ( all photographs in this post I took during a Christmas in Rome ), video by Khan Academy :

Julius Caesar Marble  Bust in the  Vatican Museum

\Marble bust of Caesar at the Vatican Museum

The walls of this gallery at the Vatican are lined with marble busts:

Marble busts at the Vatican Museum

Visited the Colosseum in the evening on Christmas day and it was absolutely a solitary and beautiful experience, with a bit of drizzle and without a single living soul in sight.

Colosseum in Rome  up close

Colosseum in Rome  up close

Colosseum in Rome  at nightime

Colosseum in Rome  at nightime

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Interactive high-resolution annotated zoom into Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights

https://tuinderlusten-jheronimusbosch.ntr.nl/en#

Accompanied by medievalish music and sheep bleating.

The Garden of Earthly Delights

Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights was (one) of the reasons I went to Madrid. The Garden is in the Prado and is just as stunning as the online projects show her to be. Plan to visit the painting in off hours as there is usually a crowd waiting to inspect it, and it is a delight. I spent several hours with and around the painting just breathing the molecules of paint flakes in the air, hoping to breathe in enough so it stays with me.

Also worth a visit in Madrid are the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía and the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum. The Gasparini room in the Royal palace is also a pleasure visually.

As I was writing the post I went to the Prado website and … behold there is an Ingres exhibition.  Ingres is better than Leonardo in complete drawings, I tell you. Now that with google you can travel pretty much anywhere in the world from your Saturday morning bed – take a trip through the beautiful and the intellectual and into this painting. Visit it in person if you can.

 

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A 19th-Century Vision of the Year 2000

http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/france-in-the-year-2000-1899-1910/

 A series of futuristic pictures by Jean-Marc Côté and other artists issued in France in 1899, 1900, 1901 and 1910. Originally in the form of paper cards enclosed in cigarette/cigar boxes and, later, as postcards, the images depicted the world as it was imagined to be like in the then distant year of 2000…

 A 19th-Century Vision of the Year 2000

A 19th-Century Vision of the Year 2000

For anyone with a roomba

A 19th-Century Vision of the Year 2000

A 19th-Century Vision of the Year 2000

A 19th-Century Vision of the Year 2000

A 19th-Century Vision of the Year 2000

A 19th-Century Vision of the Year 2000

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A look Inside The World Of Chinese ‘Copy-Culture’ – Chinese artists make Van Gogh copies for a Dutch Bank. Every new client gets a Van Gogh painting, says the dealer.

And here is my stance on the matter – if they can copy Van Gogh – more power to them.  Copyright doesn’t have a place in art as all art is derivative. Picasso ripped aboriginal art, Van Gogh was inspired by Japanese woodcuts. The only takeaway here is that art carries power and presence. It only takes a corner of a sunflower to know it is Van Gogh, it takes an eye and a bit of nose to tell a Picasso, and it takes the corner of a Millennium Falcon to know it’s Star Wars. It is the strength of the artist’s ideas that overcomes us. And if there’s a place in China somewhere that makes good Van Goghs – the world is only better for it to be honest.

A link directly to the Van Gogh’s copies in the timeline – I think they are pretty good:

Enjoy in its entirety:

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The High Art of the Low Countries

 

A review of the first in the series in the Telegraph with an outline of the ideas covered in this documentary.  Artists  and their masterpieces covered: van Eyck, van der Weyden, Bosch, Bruegel, Rubens.

I remember seeing the Rubens and Brueghel exhibit at The Mauritshuis in The Hague in the Netherlands and it was one of the most magical experiences in paint I had ever seen.

Some of the art covered in the documentary:
Ghent Altarpiece
Garden of Earthly Delights

 

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The Greatest Artist that ever Lived – Virtual Tour of The Sistine Chapel

There are hundreds of to do lists of the “hundred things to do before you die” sort. I have only one item and it is the Sistine Chapel, painted by Michelangelo. A One Man Show of gigantic proportions that has been around for 500 years and still makes ordinary beings like myself weak in the head.

Photography at the Chapel is not allowed and I was happy to discover The Vatican has kept up with the 21st Century and put this online. If there is one thing that is worth the price of admission and a round trip ticket so you could see it in person, this is it. Below is a link to the Vatican website that hosts the tour online.

virtual-tour-of-sistine-chapel

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