Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

I am interested in how scientists and philosophers interpret the world we live in today, as I interpret the world as an artist. One of The Interpretation Of Quantum Mechanics is the Many Worlds one – this is one of the most beautiful and favorite things of mine to read  about since I absolutely understand none of it. Like Narnia for adults.

I love the idea of a schizophrenic universe. To quote something I read at random on the internet:
“When a universe “splits” (it doesn’t really – it just looks like it has, but that’s a long story), and assuming you accept consciousness as an emergent phenomena of the physical brain, then your consciousness splits too. And as events in the two universes drift apart, so do the copies of the consciousness.”

Here is a paper that talks about the rise of the Many Worlds interpretation as the main challenger to the status quo interpretation:

http://arxiv.org/pdf/quant-ph/9709032v1.pdf

So what is the Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics?

Here:

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/qm-manyworlds/#2.1

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A Life in Japan – Documentary (English with English subtitles)

it is a mystery why I became obsessed with Japan, after all I was born 9016.92 kilometers, 5602.86 miles miles and 4868.75 nautical miles from it. What portion of the neural paths in my brain decided to connect with the image of Japan, made me think and read about it? Where I grew up there was very little information and attachment to Japanese things and my first visual contact with Japan was through a Taschen book on Japanese Gardens.

When I moved to the States – it was in Northern California and the Bay Area was very connected to Japanese culture. One of my landlords used to tell me a story about Japanese businessman coming to the Silicon Valley before it was the Silicon Valley and waving 100 bills in bars, while supposedly looking for investment opportunities in the daytime. I went to Japan on two occasions and especially the second time – on a solo trip with my camera – I felt a deep pull towards every single train, temple, crowded intersection, pond, sand pattern, high tech shop and piece of sushi. I am still mystified as to why.

I never considered living in Japan as I don’t believe I will be happy with the day to day subduedness of life. But there are so many threads still connecting me, emotionally and artistically, to Japan, that I technically don’t need to.

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IS LIFE WORTH LIVING?

O CT OB ER, 1 8 9 5.

IS LIFE WORTH LIVING? Read more here.

WHEN Mr. Mallock’s book with this title appeared some fifteen years ago, the jocose answer that
” it depends on the liver”
had great currency in the newspapers.
The answer that I propose to give today cannot be jocose.
In the words of one of Shakespeare’s prologues,
” I come no more to make you laugh;
things now that bear a weighty and a serious brow,
sad, high, and working,
full of state and woe,”

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Some Kind of Garden: A Journey Into Zen [Kindle Edition] is now live on the Kindle store

Some Kind of Garden: A Journey Into Zen [Kindle Edition]

Mysterious and enigmatic, abstract and impenetrable, the Zen gardens of Kyoto are a product of enlightened and sophisticated culture whose aim was to transcend nature by means of a man made nature.

The empty space, the surrounding landscape and the frame of mind of the viewer are all part of the design. A design that transcends representation, meaning and ideology. A powerful idea distilled to simple ingredients, the evaporation of art as we know it.

The book is a collection of photographs I took and small poems I wrote during my journey to the Zen gardens of Kyoto. I felt it is impossible to untangle their mystery with the rational instrument of reason. It is a stream of visual and versed thoughts on the joyful occasion of simply being there.

Accompanying my photographs and poems are several short verses from Basho, Ryokan and other Zen poets. Their words have sometimes been modified to fit my own frame of mind, using their verses᠆ superior ability to express my own feelings.

This book is about the frame of mind and the geometry of calm that the Zen gardens of Kyoto represent. As there are no explanations on the walls of the gardens as to the meaning of the sand patterns, so is my book void of explanations and floats on a visual lotus, like an imaginary house.

This book is a photographic essay about the Zen gardens of Kyoto, designed specifically for the Kindle and features stunning, high-resolution photographs accompanied by small poems I wrote and small verses by Zen poets. It is crafted to create a calm space of the mind, a vision of tranquility and peace.

The title derives its name from an ongoing photographic chronicles I called “some kind of” project, of which Some Kind of Garden is the first volume.

Some Kind of Garden: A Journey Into Zen
Some Kind of Garden: A Journey Into Zen
by Mirena Rhee
  Learn more  

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Grandpa passed away 29 years ago today, he was a painter, a businessman, a family man who kept extended family together

grandpa-intarsia
Couple of Grandpa’s Intarsias, the right one is a stylized vision of Tsarevets
Fortress that inspired the Intarsia - Tsarevets
Fortress that inspired the Intarsia – Tsarevets

My grandparents’ house was always full of guests – friends, relatives, immediate and extended family were always welcomed, fed and entertained.

My grandmother was a perfect hostess and homemaker and baked the most delicious desserts from a leafy book of secret recipes.

grandpa

 

Here is my grandfather sporting a mustache, to the right of the little girl who is actually my aunt whom he had to take care of but couldn’t find a babysitter so she ended up at the party – Union Club, Sofia 1938.

A couple of grandpa’s paintings always travel with me.  Usually they are proudly displayed and occasionally hide behind clutter when  I work on the walls. Here are some pics of his Intarsia work – in my studio. Sorry grandpa, unlike you I get sloppy and not always properly hang them.

IMG_1969

IMG_1969_1

_MG_9361

 

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